In The Pickwick Papers, Dickens has a character say of another that he was teaching little lessons to little boys. The phrase sounds sad to my ears. I want to teach great lessons to great servants of God. I want to pass on grand truths about God and eternity. While keeping our feet on the ground, I want to explore the wonderful themes of God coming to be among us and redeem us. Continue reading

Here’s a great list to ponder over.

Roy Zuck wrote a book called Teaching as Jesus Taught and identified fifteen reasons that Jesus asked questions. Here is his list for your consideration:

  1. To cause someone to recall facts
  2. To promote conversation
  3. To point out something that isn’t true
  4. To get agreement
  5. To push for an expression of faith
  6. To prod for an opinion
  7. To prove faith and commitment
  8. To promote reflection and thinking
  9. To persuade critics of error
  10. To pull people up
  11. To pour out emotions
  12. To reveal motives
  13. To prick the conscience
  14. To pinpoint a topic
  15. To press for the application of the truth

via Why would Jesus ask a question? | Burns Church of Christ.

A question isn’t always a mere question; they can also be used for evil, as did Jesus’ enemies. And they have many uses for good, as this list shows. We use questions without thinking, as a part of our dialogues. Perhaps more awareness might help us make better use of them.

Another whole area of study is how questions are used in other cultures and in what settings, and what they mean, which may be different than what they might mean to an American. (Or a non-American.)

I’ve been adding my smaller blurbs over at (or in?) The Fellowship Room recently. Some of them might have been inserted here, but I put them there, in this initial phase of getting things up and running.

At TFR, I’ve been asking a Daily Nudge, a question to prompt, or prime, our participants. Today’s question asked what they’ll be teaching tomorrow. Continue reading