How can two groups read the same Bible and reach completely different conclusions? This question, so common in our day, could have been asked centuries ago about the Sadducees and Pharisees. And Paul makes it clear that one side was right.

(For the Sadducees say there is no resurrection, or angel, or spirit, but the Pharisees acknowledge them all.)
Acts 28.8 NET Continue reading

Preparing the Quick Bible Truths tweet for this morning, which lately has been following the daily NT reading schedule, I wanted a submission really upbeat and positive. Well, Luke 20 isn’t one of those chapters for cheery thoughts. It presents the conflict between Jesus and the authorities in its final, hottest moment, before his betrayal.

After Jesus cleanses the temple, they challenge his authority (1-8). Not every question is a simple request for information. Questions are used for many purposes, with a variety of motivations. Theirs, like the later question on taxes, was designed “to take advantage of what he might say so that they could deliver him up to the authority and jurisdiction of the governor” (v. 20). One would think that “teaching … and proclaiming the gospel” (v. 1) would be innocent and harmless activities, but the Lord invaded their territory “in the temple courts.” As well, he was teaching “the people,” where the priests, scribes, and elders (probably indicating the Sanhedrin) exerted their influence. Everything Jesus did was wrong, in their mind. Continue reading