Tears of a soldierby J. Randal Matheny © 2011

The Battle of Unnumbered Tears
Was fiercely fought upon a field,
Where neither side would give or yield,
And neither heard the victors’ cheers.

Hard against the Whitened Downs,
Struck man and beast his match and pair;
Horses’ hooves cleaved heavy air,
From royal heads fell regal crowns.

The greening slopes were ground and churned,
As armies’ met to mete their worst;
Soldiers, downed, on dying cursed,
Ambitions bled and hopes were burned.

_oO¥Oo_

The title and first line come from J.R.R. Tolkein’s book, The Silmarillion. My poem has nothing to do with his book or the battle mentioned therein. It was suggestive of an idea, which I ran with.

People have their forbidden subjects. Depending on place, person, and epoch, some things can’t be talked about. Sex, money, politics, and other topics have been considered taboo at some point. In the church, politics was off limits, but no more it seems. Sex and money are still considered bad topics, or, at least, sensitive, and to be treated with kid gloves.

But the Lord has no such list of forbidden subjects. We can talk to him about anything. Temptations. Sorrows. Struggles. Conflicts.

While we may wish that we could be upfront with people like that, we can be certain that the Lord will not frown or chide us for putting it all before him. That’s what he wants. And that’s the gist of today’s Cloudburst poem.

Once again, Cloudburst poems are available only to the list subscribers. Here’s why.

The form is one of my favorites, a seven-line stanza. The rhyme scheme is A-B-C-B-C-B-A.

First time for rhyme and meter since my trip to the U.S., this Cloudburst poem turns to the universal theme of romantic love, but more than that, wedded bliss and commitment love. The seven-line iambic pentameter uses an A-B-A-B-A-C-C rhyme scheme.

The idea and some lines of the poem was taken from a pay-for-hire gig I did for a guy in Thailand. I revamped it entirely, removing his personal references and information, and adapted it to my own situation, though not so specific that other married couples can’t use it to express theirs as well. It would make, say, a nice wedding anniversary poem. Continue reading