Glory for Jesus

God reveals his glory to man. He revealed it most fully in Jesus. Jesus’ miracles showed his divine nature. They were done to bring us to believe in him and confess him as the Chosen One. Praise God for his glory in Jesus!

He shall see his offspring

Yet it was the will of the Lord to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand. Isaiah 53.10 ESV

Isaiah speaks of the suffering servant in terms of the people of Israel, of the remnant, and finally of a single person. He narrows the identification of the servant until he arrives in chapter 53. In this chapter, he reveals details of how the servant would suffer for the sins of others. Continue reading “He shall see his offspring”

First and Last

When I saw him I fell down at his feet as though I were dead, but he placed his right hand on me and said: “Do not be afraid! I am the first and the last, and the one who lives! I was dead, but look, now I am alive—forever and ever—and I hold the keys of death and of Hades!” Revelation 1.17-18

These were some of the first words of the Lord Jesus to the apostle John when, on the Lord’s day, he found himself in the Spirit. John had already registered a word from God the Father, that he was the Alpha and the Omega, in verse 8. Alpha is the first letter of the Greek alphabet; omega, the last. Continue reading “First and Last”

See his glory

Now the Word became flesh and took up residence among us. We saw his glory—the glory of the one and only, full of grace and truth, who came from the Father. John 1.14

Becoming flesh means that Jesus became a human being. He also was born according to the will of God and not by human means, John 1.13. He participated fully in human life. He lived among us and experienced all that people do—hunger, thirst, tiredness, emotions, suffering—minus one—sin. He was God and man at the same time. Continue reading “See his glory”

Glory for Jesus

Jesus is both God and man. He was sent by the Father and spoke exactly what the Father taught him. Only by following Jesus can we have life and avoid darkness. What a wonderful promise is this! God be praised for his eternal Son!

All Life Is Centered

What mercy! One of the privileged few:
The world transformed the day Christ entered
My barren life, created anew;
Around the Lord all life is centered,
In him is Yes, the promise kept;
By rousing, robust grace I’m mentored
To share the news, to walk where he stepped.

Glory for not grasping

Holy, holy, holy is the God of power and might,
Glory, glory, glory, dwelling in unapproachable light,
Humble, humble, humble — at equality Christ did not grasp,
Mercy, mercy, mercy, at this love he made us gasp.

Why Jesus asked questions

Here’s a great list to ponder over.

Roy Zuck wrote a book called Teaching as Jesus Taught and identified fifteen reasons that Jesus asked questions. Here is his list for your consideration:

  1. To cause someone to recall facts
  2. To promote conversation
  3. To point out something that isn’t true
  4. To get agreement
  5. To push for an expression of faith
  6. To prod for an opinion
  7. To prove faith and commitment
  8. To promote reflection and thinking
  9. To persuade critics of error
  10. To pull people up
  11. To pour out emotions
  12. To reveal motives
  13. To prick the conscience
  14. To pinpoint a topic
  15. To press for the application of the truth

via Why would Jesus ask a question? | Burns Church of Christ.

A question isn’t always a mere question; they can also be used for evil, as did Jesus’ enemies. And they have many uses for good, as this list shows. We use questions without thinking, as a part of our dialogues. Perhaps more awareness might help us make better use of them.

Another whole area of study is how questions are used in other cultures and in what settings, and what they mean, which may be different than what they might mean to an American. (Or a non-American.)

We have seen incredible things today

“Then astonishment seized them all, and they glorified God. They were filled with awe, saying, ‘We have seen incredible things today.’”
Luke 5:26 NET

When Jesus forgave the sins of the paralitic man, he was criticized. But when the crowd saw Jesus cure the man, and the man walking and carrying his stretcher, the witnesses glorified God and exclaimed that they had seen something extraordinary.

Afterwards, Jesus calls Levi to follow him, and criticisms rain down on him again, No praises.

The verse above concludes the passage about the paralytic, but do you reckon that Luke isn’t wishing that the reader would make a similar exclamation about Levi’s calling?

For what is more incredible: forgiving sins, reclaiming a soul, inspiring a fat cat to leave his riches in order to follow the Lord, or restoring a man’s body? Is it not the former?

Today, things haven’t changed much. We are impressed with the material, while the spiritual passes unnoticed. Or criticized.

What impresses you?