Surely not I

Lord's supper reflectionThe question the disciples ask, even though it appears to be rhetorical, is an appropriate one for Christians as well, especially so during the Lord’s supper. It was during the Passover/establishment of the supper that they asked it, when Jesus said that one of them would betray him.

They were distressed, and one by one said to him, “Surely not I?”
Mark 14.19 NET Continue reading “Surely not I”

One of the early believers

There is no special merit before God for length of time as a Christian. But in the first century, it meant that those who were converted at the beginning were present for many of the events that marked the beginning of the church and of the Christian era. This would have brought a valuable perspective for the time. One of these converts was Mnason.

Some believers from Caesarea accompanied us, and they took us to the home of Mnason, a man originally from Cyprus and one of the early believers.
Acts 21.16 NLT Continue reading “One of the early believers”

I have not departed

FaithfulnessMany have abandoned the truth of the gospel. Others, upon learning of original Christianity according to the New Testament, have refused to follow Jesus and remained in their way of perdition. Even in the midst of suffering, Job maintained his commitment to God’s commandments.

I have not departed from the commands of His lips;
I have treasured the words of His mouth
more than my daily food.
Job 23:12 HCSB Continue reading “I have not departed”

So quickly deserting

The world brings increasingly rapid change. With the means of communication that we have today at our disposal, we know about and often adopt changes in a matter of days or even hours. And not all the changes are good. Often, they aren’t thought through, as we follow the wave of the latest fashion.

In days of old, as well, rapid and negative changes took place.

I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting the one who called you by the grace of Christ and are following a different gospel.
Galatians 1:6 NET

Peter discovered how one can change quickly, one moment walking on the water, only to soon be sinking in the storm; or, declaring loyalty to Jesus, only to deny him by swearing a few hours later.

People who yesterday were faithful to the gospel of Christ today are following another teaching. God knows their motives, but there is no doubt that they have changed and that quickly, to follow the newest wave of popularity.

Paul sought to call people back to the gospel. Let us do the same, in order that, by some means, we may save some. For such changes, rapid or slow, are never good.

The righteous who yields

I witnessed, some weeks ago, a conversation between a brother I considered faithful and a progressive in the church. I was feeling content with the firmness of the brother until the progressive accused him of creating division because of his protest against false doctrine. The brother apologized and grew silent.

A righteous person who yields to the wicked
is like a muddied spring or a polluted well.
Proverbs 25:26 HCSB

Great promise, poorly fulfilled. So is the just person who, because of the inevitable pressure, gives way before the wicked. The wicked may appear anywhere, even in the church. He pushes constantly toward evil. He uses every resource to pressure, persuade, and win, if not participation, at least, acceptance from others.

Few in the church, from what one sees, do not yield to the flood of impurity and worldliness which crashes upon the faithful.

Will you be one of them?

Poem: Faithful to the point of death

Faithful to the Point of Death

by J. Randal Matheny © 2011

Revelation 2:10

Faithful to the point of death,
Of dying for the glorious Name,
Confessing with expiring breath,
To stand before the Lord without shame,
Let this of me be said,
“He lives though he be dead.”

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Teacher evaluation

DoctrineEducational systems and school directors create, from time to time, various methods to evaluate the teacher, be it grade school or university. The methods vary, depending on the pedagogical philosophy.

By pointing out such things to the brothers and sisters, you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus, having nourished yourself on the words of the faith and of the good teaching that you have followed.
1 Timothy 4:6 NET

To be a good servant of Christ means speaking what people need to hear, not what they want to hear. It means teaching sound doctrine, not giving in to popular false teachings.

When used to refer to a teacher, the adjective “good” transmits the idea that he does his work well in God’s sight. The teacher is good when he faithfully delivers the divine teaching, not when he impresses or pleases his hearers.

This evaluation method will never change.