Day by day, O Lord, let us ardently seek your presence, lovingly walk with you and willingly spend ourselves in your service. At the day’s end let us not be found hiding our talents nor at the end of our life be unready to rise up and meet you in the feast of your kingdom; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

—Richard Baxter (1615-1691)

O God who looks down upon us and came among us, we ask your blessing upon our dearest family members and friends, and upon those who are far from us in distance and spirit, that you might be near, whatever comes. With you beside them, they will have nothing to fear. May their confidence in you be strong and unmixed with doubt. Permit that they, through your intimate words of Scripture, your ear close to their mouths, and your people surrounding them, keep before them your pure goodness and your infinite power, always working in them, through them, and above them, by the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

I almost used this prayer for Believing Prayer today, but finally opted to do something original. It expresses beautifully the full dependence on God.

Grant us grace, O God, to take your Son for our Redeemer, his life for our example, his word for our rule, his Spirit for our guide, his wounds for our healing and his cross for our salvation, that he may take possession of our hearts, now and for ever. Amen.

—Jeremy Taylor (1613-1657)

Prayer of the Day

Our good brother Weylan Deaver has an excellent article on “Intercession and Mediation.” Here’s a hefty part of it, but not near all of it, which deserves calm and careful study.

There is nothing in either the concept of intercession or the biblical context of intercession to limit it to a single party. In point of fact, as these examples show, multiple parties are involved in interceding.

Mediation is a different story. “For there is one God, and there is one mediator [Gr. mesites] between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Tim. 2:5). A mesites is a go-between, belonging solely to neither party, but who represents at least two parties, each to the other. Think of it this way. An intercessor pleads on another’s behalf (imagine an arrow pointing one way, from the intercessor to God). But a mediator represents two parties to each other (imagine arrows pointing both directions, from saints to God and from God to saints). Being God, Jesus is perfectly qualified to present God to men. And, having become a man, Jesus is perfectly qualified to present men to God. Christ’s station is unique. He is the gateway to atonement, the door to redemption. As mediator, Jesus is the conduit of two-way representation, bringing God and redeemed man together. No one else could. This is why there can be multiple intercessors, but only a single mediator. Let us thank God for both! –via Intercession and Mediation

Weylan does a good job of helping us to get a handle on two important, yea, essential, concepts of Scripture.

Wonder if he’ll let us translate it into Portuguese?