Turning aside to myths, then and now

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And they will turn away from hearing the truth, but on the other hand they will turn aside to myths.
2 Timothy 4.4 NET

When moderns call something a myth, we refer to a tale or story that is obviously untrue, a fiction created by primitives to explain their origins and give their existence meaning. It’s a word used today by look-down-the-nose superiors. Continue reading

Reverting to an old theme, for now

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With complaints that the text of the former theme was hard to read, I’ve reverted, for now, to an older theme I once used, Writr, until the next spiffy one appears. This theme has a heavy text font, which ought to take care of any problems at the moment.

A writer cannot have the medium mess up the message. Nope, so we must deal quickly with that.

Background images do not show up well in this theme, but we’ll make do.

With swords and clubs under the cover of night

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At that moment Jesus said to the crowd, “Have you come out with swords and clubs to arrest me like you would an outlaw? Day after day I sat teaching in the temple courts, yet you did not arrest me.”
Matthew 26.55 NET

To arrest the Lord the crowd, fronting the Jewish rulers, resorted to violence and the cover of night for their injustice. His crime was teaching in the light of day, in the midst of the people, challenging the power structure protected by priests and rulers in order to bring the presence of God to a people who had forgotten what it meant to be a holy nation. The One who welcomed children into his lap broke down the barriers to God erected not only by sin in general but especially by those who were supposed to represent the Almighty. He was indeed a threat to them, which they well understood. So they continue in the same vein to protect their interests by arresting the Lamb of God through violence and subterfuge.

Jesus heals the lonely soul and drives the rebellious into white-hot resistance. Which are you?

Cloudburst: Beneath My Hands

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On an open-source social media in a far, far realm of virtual space, where only plain text finds a place upon a user’s wall, where the mark of a writer is the strength of his word, did appear these brief and simple lines lauding that plane supporting the tools of tongue and trade.

And here may you, who were, among all mankind, the recipients of that missive containing these lines, speak to their creator.

Be you worthy, beware your speaking, and bear well your privilege.

http://cloudburstpoetry.com

More loyal

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The Levites obeyed your word
and guarded your covenant.
They were more loyal to you
than to their own parents.
They ignored their relatives
and did not acknowledge their own children.
Dt 33.9 NLT

After the Israelites worshiped the golden calf in the desert, Moses ordered the faithful to kill the sinners among the people, Exodus 32. The Levites fulfilled the order and were blessed by God for it. The Lord reserves a blessing for him who obeys his commandments instead of bowing before the desire to be accepted by one’s loved ones.

Translated from the Portuguese-language devotional DeusConosco.com.

A fire that burns completely

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Such sin is like a fire that burns until it destroys everything.
It would completely ruin my life’s work.
Job 31.12 ERV

Many a ruler has been toppled after getting caught in some crime or moral offense. Not a few of God’s people have also lost influence and destroyed their ministry as well. Job defends himself with his knowledge of what sin would do to his life and service to God. He takes the long view, rather than succumb to the momentary desire. Sin destroys, and it destroys completely. This knowledge will keep many a saint from the wrong step.

Day by day

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Day by day, O Lord, let us ardently seek your presence, lovingly walk with you and willingly spend ourselves in your service. At the day’s end let us not be found hiding our talents nor at the end of our life be unready to rise up and meet you in the feast of your kingdom; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

—Richard Baxter (1615-1691)